v0.31:Glass

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This article is about an older version of DF.

Glass is produced at the glass furnace using fuel with either sand (green glass), sand and pearlash (clear glass), or rock crystal and pearlash (crystal glass). A magma glass furnace can also be used, in which case no fuel is required. Raw glass (of all three types) can now be acquired from some trade caravans and be purchased in the embark screen. Note that raw glass can not be made into glass items, but can only be cut into gem-like items which can be used for decorating items. You have to buy or collect sand to get the raw materials to make glass.

Glass is valued based on the difficulty in making it, with green glass being the lowest value and crystal glass being the highest.

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[edit] Uses

Glass may be used to produce most things that can be produced at a carpenter's workshop, with the exception of beds, medical supplies, training weapons, and possibly other things. In addition, it may be used to produce glass gems. These, especially ones made of green glass, are excellent practice for aspiring jewelers (and their production provides experience for glassmakers). Glass can also be shaped into blocks which can be used to build workshops and constructions. You can even make glass trap components.

For more information on the use of glass, see the Glass industry page.

Raw and cut glass storage options can be found under the Gem stockpile sub-menu. Glass blocks are stored in Bar/Block stockpiles.

[edit] Bugs

  • Making raw crystal glass or crystal glass items is currently not functional. Despite rough rock crystals being available, the game will announce 'Needs glass-making rough gems' Bug:1498. See the bug entry for information on how to patch this bug for version 0.31.25 on Windows or Linux.
  • Raw clear glass and raw crystal glass cannot be selected for cutting or encrusting tasks at the jeweler's workshop. The tasks are available in the Job Manager screen.

[edit] Glass and Magma

Glass behaves somewhat oddly with magma, despite being strictly magma-safe (with a melting point of 13,600°U) - glass objects dropped into magma tend to disappear instantly (a property seemingly shared by every non-INORGANIC material), but built glass furniture will survive indefinitely when covered with magma.

[edit] Physical Properties

Through memory hacking, the material properties of each type of glass have been determined; for reference, they have been reconstructed below as material definitions:

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