v0.31:Dog

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Dog

d

Biome

Pet Attributes
Pet value 30

Can be trained for either hunting or for war 

Size
Birth: 1,000 cm3
Mid: 12,500 cm3
Max: 30,000 cm3
Butchering returns

Food items

Meat 6-13
Fat 6-13
Brain 1
Heart 0-1
Lungs 2
Intestines 1
Liver 0-1
Kidneys 0-2
Tripe 0-1
Sweetbread 0-1
Spleen 0-1

Raw materials

Bones 4-11
Skull 1
Skin Raw hide

Wikipedia article

This article is about an older version of DF.
A medium-sized highly social mammalian carnivore. It has a keen sense of smell. It can be trained to obey commands.

Dogs are trainable into war/hunting dogs. See Kennel for how this is done, and for a list of other trainable creatures.

A dwarf's best friend, dogs are among many animals that can be trained to assist your dwarves in combat or hunting as either war dogs or hunting dogs. Like all tame animals they can serve as an emergency food supply and provide you with bones, leather, and skulls.

Using dogs

Dogs left to their own devices will wander around, spending most of their time in meeting areas, and will attack any hostiles they see.

As with any friendly creature, dogs can spot ambushers and thieves. You can assign dogs to restraints to act as guard dogs.
Guard dogs work particularly well when placed behind a hall of traps or other siege-breaking devices. The traps will prevent aggressive invaders from harming the dogs, while the dogs prevent thieves from sneaking past the traps into the base. (Ideally, the dogs should be out of view of the trap corridor to prevent injury from ranged weapons.)

You can assign a war dog or hunting dog to a dwarf via his dogs menu (v, select dwarf, p, e) to help him in combat. It will follow the dwarf like a pet.

Note: Once a dog is assigned to a dwarf it can not be unassigned nor placed in a cage. A work-around for this is, when you train the dog, to use the dwarf you want the dog to be assigned to. Unassigned war dogs and hunting dogs follow the dwarf who trained them, but can still be caged.

Note: Using a Civilian Alert to keep civilians away from fighting seems to affect war dogs as well, stoping them from following your soldiers into combat.

Note: Unlike in previous versions you can now slaughter War Dogs for food.

Hunting dogs

"A hunting animal will target the creature its owner is targeting if the owner is hunting, and it will be sneaking without a movement penalty if it is reasonably close to its hunting owner. A hunting animal notices creatures from farther away, although this isn't exactly effective if it decides to target what its owner is targeting. It all needs a bit of work, but that is true of hunting in general." -Toady One, long before v0.31

War dogs

War dogs do more damage than dogs.

Against heavily armored and armed opponents, dogs (war or hunting) can die quite easily, but that doesn't mean they are "useless." Also, although a wardog is not nearly as dangerous against an armored opponent as an Axe Lord, they occasionally get lucky, and a pack of War Dogs can be very dangerous indeed. They can also be used as walking meatshields, taking hits that would have otherwise injured your dwarves.

For this reason, some players attach them to any permanent close-combat military, and/or to any dwarf that regularly steps outside.